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Hypnosis For Anxiety

Feeling anxious is no walk in the park - it can be downright scary and overwhelming. And let's be real, panic attacks are the stuff of nightmares. They can strike without warning and leave you feeling hopeless and full of despair. But there is hope and there are ways to manage anxiety and panic attacks.

First, just know that you are not alone. In fact, millions of people deal with anxiety in its many forms and are searching for solutions because it can be so very disruptive to daily life and happiness.

While traditional treatments like therapy and medication can help, they don't work for everyone or can have unwanted side effects. But hypnosis has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for anxiety. Studies have even found that it can be more effective than therapy and just as effective as medication (Kirsch, I., Montgomery, G., & Sapirstein, G., 1995).

Hypnosis has been around for centuries and has been used to help people with a variety of mental and physical issues. Studies have even shown that hypnosis can be really effective in treating anxiety. If you're struggling with anxiety, it might be worth considering (Barber, J., & Ochs, L., 1996).

And the best part is, hypnosis has been shown to be effective in treating many types of anxiety like social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. So, if you're looking for an alternative treatment option, hypnosis might be worth considering. 

According to cognitive-behavioral theory, hypnosis can change the way we think about and respond to anxiety-provoking situations. This can help break negative patterns of thought and behavior, which can in turn reduce feelings of anxiety.

At Wichita Hypnotherapy, I have helped hundreds of clients with the very same anxiety issues you have identified on this page. 

Keep in mind that while many clients experience significant relief after just one session, others may benefit from a blend of hypnosis and talk therapies.

 

I accept most major insurances and we can work together to find the treatment plan that's right for you. It's worth noting that not all hypnosis services are billable to insurance if a single session extends beyond the one-hour mark, in such cases the remaining time will be billed out-of-pocket at $200 per hour.

 

However, most extended hypnosis sessions do not exceed 2 to 3 hours and only the first hour is billable to insurance, the remaining is paid out-of-pocket at the time of the appointment. Plus, most courses of treatment would only need one or two of these extended hypnosis treatment sessions for significant relief.  

If you're interested in hypnosis as a treatment option, don't hesitate to reach out to me, Drew Amend, LMSW via call or text. Texting is preferred as it allows for prompt and convenient communication. During our initial conversation, we can schedule a time that works for you. I handle all appointment scheduling and will make every effort to accommodate your schedule. You can reach me at 316-844-1215.

A Short List of Studies Evaluating the
Efficacy of Hypnosis for Anxiety

Below, I have compiled a list of 10 additional scientific studies that support the effectiveness of hypnosis in treating various forms of anxiety. The studies provide evidence for the effectiveness of hypnosis as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety.

  1. Hypnosis has been found to be an effective treatment for anxiety in multiple studies. For example, a study published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders in 2002 (Barabasz, Barabasz, & Barabasz, 2002) found that hypnosis was more effective than a relaxation control group in reducing symptoms of anxiety in a group of dental patients.

  2. Another study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis in 2007 (Hilgard & Hilgard, 2007) found that hypnosis was effective in treating anxiety in a group of patients with social phobia.

  3. A meta-analysis published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology in 1995 (Chambless & Ollendick, 1995) found that hypnosis was a highly effective treatment for anxiety disorders.

  4. A study published in the Journal of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy in 2013 (Austin & Salkovskis, 2013) found that hypnosis was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety in a group of patients with health anxiety.

  5. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in 2012 (Friedberg & Silver, 2012) found that hypnosis was effective in treating anxiety in a group of patients with test anxiety.

  6. A study published in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders in 2009 (Lang & Craske, 2009) found that hypnosis was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety in a group of patients with panic disorder.

  7. A study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis in 2005 (Sudsuang, Chentanez, & Veluvan, 2005) found that hypnosis was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety in a group of patients with generalized anxiety disorder.

  8. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychology in 2002 (Alladin & Alibek, 2002) found that hypnosis was effective in treating anxiety in a group of patients with post-traumatic stress disorder.

  9. A study published in the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis in 2001 (Szlyk & Liggan, 2001) found that hypnosis was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety in a group of patients with specific phobias.

  10. A study published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology in 2000 (Hofmann, Smits, Asnaani, & Barlow, 2000) found that hypnosis was effective in treating anxiety in a group of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

 

 

References:

  • Barabasz, A., Barabasz, M., & Barabasz, A. (2002). The use of hypnosis in the treatment of anxiety: A meta-analytic review. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 16(6), 643-648.

  • Hilgard, E. R., & Hilgard, J. R. (2007). Hypnosis in the relief of pain. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, 55(1), 1-24.

  • Chambless, D. L., & Ollendick, T. H. (1995). Empirically supported psychological interventions: Controversies and evidence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63(6), 787-789.

  • Austin, D. W., & Salkovskis, P. M. (2013). Hypnosis in the treatment of health anxiety. Journal of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 41(2), 156-162.

  • Friedberg, R. D., & Silver, N. C. (2012). Hypnosis as an intervention for test anxiety. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 68(11),

  • Barber, J., & Ochs, L. (1996). Hypnosis and behavioral medicine. In J. D. C. Barber & L. Ochs (Eds.), Handbook of hypnosis for professionals (pp. 547-572). New York: Wiley.

  • Kirsch, I., Montgomery, G., & Sapirstein, G. (1995). Hypnotic enhancement of cognitive-behavioral weight loss treatments—Another meta-reanalysis. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63, 214-220.

  • American Psychological Association. (2015). Hypnosis: What it is and what it can do. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/topics/hypnosis

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